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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
that in the people who are speaking out and those who are not, there's a shift in attitudes, as the "new york times" puts in their headline today, i think will be lasting. i don't know how any -- there are several networks, not just ours, having trouble finding pro gun advocates to speak out because there's really nothing to say at this point. can you think of anything in your political career, where something has happened and you realize you just can't take -- >> 9/11. 9/11 happened and there were a lot of conservatives after 9/11 very wary, very suspicious of federal government expansion, expansion of powers. and i'm one of them. that afterwards, you're like, okay, if the tsa wants to be intrusive, let the tsa be intrusive. if we have to do things that make me uncomfortable, as a small government conservative. fine. this is really, this is a domestic version of 9/11, where everything changed. >> everything did change. one thing joe manchin said yesterday, after he talked about his transformation and the way he thinks about guns and gun rights, was that the president needs to move quickly on this
to webster, new york, for a second day, for the wake and funeral services of these two fallen heroes you're looking at. the two volunteer firefighters were killed in a christmas eve ambush when they responded to a house fire and gunned down by 62-year-old william spa spankler and police arrested a woman for purchasing the gun. and they're making sure that the visiting firefighters have a place to say. hampton inn in webster expecting between 100 and 150 of the firefighters and thanks tonations lot will stay free of charge. local fire departments are offering lodging for out of town firefighters. >> some new information on the deadly subway push in new york city. police now say that they have a woman in custody who they say made a statement implicating herself in the murder. this is surveillance video showing what appears to be the suspect right there, running from the platform, the sketch that you just saw earlier was what she may look like. a medium built woman believed to be in her 20's and witnesses claim she got up from a bench, suddenly pushed the man flying onto the tracks as the t
of jet lag. >> we'll take you a week. >>> "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >>> nation, i love new york city. the big apple, the city that never sleeps, rat zanadu. so i was crushed to learn the metropolis i know and love has changed. >> not one person was murdered in new york city on monday. nypd deputy commissioner paul brown couldn't even remember the last time a day went by where not one person was shot, stabbed, or slashed. >> what happened? i remember the real new york of the '80s. when in a single night you could score some weed, catch a time square porno and get stabbed in the neck by a coked up lou reid. and that was a pretty good first date. now time square has become a bubba gump wimp company. >>> good morning. it's tuesday. december 4th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset, we have msnbc senior political analyst mark haleprin. oh, my god, please stop. just get it off. get it off -- >> pulitzer prize-winning historian jon meacham. "the art of power." >> so you know why i'm doing this. last night, mika goes to madison square garden thinking she's going to see one direction
kid had to spend quality time in new york in the middle of sandy and sandy smashes in. in what way did it affect awe and what way did new york surprise you?. >> being in the middle of new york city when sandy hit, it was a, like for everyone it was a really different and strange time but what i got to see was the resiliency and the will of the people of this area to stand up and love each other, to help each other, to rebuild this city. this city a great city. this area, the people are strong. [cheers and applause] when stuff happens, they get back up and they dealt with it, you know, as well and as fiercely as it could be dealt with. i just think the humanity of the people, that is what overwhelms me. how the will of the people, was hey, we get knocked down, we get back up. new york city this whole area it has been an honor to be here during this time period. >> you're the perfect to be on our show not only are you a great american success story, you love this country. you are wearing the stars and stripes around your neck and your music is patriotic and love of country comes through.
revolt since mubarak was pushed out of power. "the new york times" also has another fascinating story. john boehner gained strong backing of the house gop. they actually say that the speaker's more powerful today than he has been since he became speaker two years ago. >> well, that's exactly the opposite of what we were discussing on the set yesterday with matt lewis. >> yeah. i guess one question is, is that story there for a purpose, which is to make him appear stronger, and also, is he strong in relation to the offer that's on the table, which is an offer that does not reflect compromise yet? >> well, he is strong, i think, as long as he's not seen as bowing down and caving in to the president. i will tell you, there are conservatives dair a s -- erick who is trying to get him removed as speaker, saying they only need 16 votes to drive john boehner out of time. >> that's kind of my point. >> a situation described as very fluid. >> how many degrees of freedom does he have from where he is now and who's holding the pen when they sign those letters? >> yeah, i don't think he's got a l
's wednesday, december 12th. look at that shot of new york city. >> wow. >> it's dark at 6:00 on the east coast. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in new york city, we have msnbc contributor, mike barnicle. >> in my ear, mika. >> no, he was at the white house. >> i don't understand. where's t.j.? >> he's off today. >> why's that? >> he was busy. he went to the white house. >> that's great. you know, alex went to the white house, too. >> and drove back himself. >> let me get this straight. so alex goes to the white house last night. >> mm-hmm. >> because, you know, right-wing bloggers, we actually -- that's how we get our talking points. they go down -- valerie and david axelrod together make a big pot roast for us. >> mm-hmm. >> and lots of gravy. and we sit around eating it. and i, of course, say okay, give me extra gravy. i'm good with it. >> right. >> best sweet tea i've ever had. >> there's a give and take. >> actually, it was a christmas party. go ahead and do your blog. you sure as hell didn't get mitt romney to like it. they're not attacking me. i wouldn't know. i don't read
" is the headline in "the wall street journal." host: that story from inside "usa today." this is from "the new york times." host: there is this from "roll call." pessimistic asstima ever. the president summoning congressional leaders. we expect there will be a stakeout afterward. we may hear from the president and we will be following all of that as the day unfolds. it's begin with david lightman. he covers capitol hill and the white house. the best sense of what you think the dynamics will be inside the room at the 3:00 p.m. meeting. guest: for all this talk of pessimism and optimism, the only people that know are the five principles in that room and i think that is important. they are all seasoned negotiators. they went to the debt ceiling stuff a year and a half ago. i think there will make an honest effort to get this thing resolved. i am not as pessimistic as others. we have seen this go to the brink before. why would you give up anything until you have to is the old saw. you have to be braced for an anything. host: the president is getting higher taxes if we go over the cliff and he can go ba
ohio and western pennsylvania and western new york state. rain through the carolinas and virginia. most of washington, d.c. area. you can see the winter storm warnings and advisories all throughout the northeast, throughout the day. this whole storm system is going to track just to the southeast of martha's vineyard and nantucket in massachusetts. the coldest side of the storm will move through boston, back through northern rhode island and into northern connecticut as well. that's why that's an area that will see most of the snowfall. picking up in intensity across pennsylvania and also back up to syracuse as well. wider view of our snouf estimates shows a widespread swath of 3 to 6 inches. in the boston area, we should pick up a few inches before it tries to mix with rain. the outer areas of cape cod should mix with rain. you go inland a bit. 3 to 6 inches could end up with seven or eight inches as well this is a southern new england snowstorm. we'll basically pick up two to four inches out of this storm. t.j. >> dylan, thank you so much. i want to turn to the legal fallout from the s
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
on in this show. fiebl funeral services for a firefighter shot and killed in upstate new york on christmas eve have just gotten underway. thousands of firefighterrings filed in on friday and saturday to pay their respe memorial services for fallen brothers. the two men were shot and killed on christmas eve, responding to a house fire, the owner had set intentionally. the suspect, william spangler, then killed himself. the second firefighter's funeral is tomorrow. a $60 billion emergency aid package for victims of super storm sandy has made it through the senate, but relief is not on the way. the pleasure has to get through the house, where its fate is far from certain. we have more from washington. >> there are a couple of reasons why the sandy aid legislation may languish in the house. number 1, the amount of the bill, and number 2, the calendar. some conservative house lawmakers are unconferring with the $60.4 billion package passed by the senate. with the tight economic situation, they may want to scale it back or include in spending cuts to offset the cost of the legislation. here's one g.
is stop reading the new york times. [laughter] much more than it used 210 or even -- >> my commentary. >> there is a sort of classic effort to say what is important and what is unimportant in accordance with an ideological schemes. you know, i don't think there's an answer to this, and it's very hard to get people to jump out of that sort of in the case of the times to liberal left, the view of the world. except over a long amount of time by pointing out to cognitive dissidence and disrupted -- discrepancies. i guess it's easier now in the sense that the state department, i remember work stopped at 630 to watch cronkite and broke off. their interpretation of the news was critical for the u.s. government. likewise, time and newsweek. i mean, you now have -- pardon me. you now have many more news broadcasts and we have the internet. so if we could just get rid of the new york times, the problem would be about 25 percent salt. i actually am serious about that because of its influence on media elites throughout the country who look at it to determine how to understand the world. >> please
for us. in the spring we experienced late freezes in michigan and new york and pennsylvania that wiped out fruit crops. a lot of small family farms, farms in northern michigan wiped out. in my home state late freezes in the spring caused cherry producers to lose practically their entire crop right off the bat. it warmed up, the buds came out, then they had a deep freeze; killed everything. our growers produce 75% of the u.s. supply of cherries. that's around 270 million pounds. and the cherry producers experienced 98% loss. now in our amendment, in the disaster bill and in the farm bill, we give them some help because they spent the rest of the crop year this year having to pay to maintain the orchards and the frees, eating the costs and hoping the trees will bounce back next year and produce a crop. so they have all the costs of maintaining everything but no revenue coming in. cherry producers were also forced to fight spreading diseases like cherry leaf spot and bacterial tinker, making the trees even more costly to maintain and at risk of loss. they didn't just lose their crop this
. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks do
and the big states, new york, california, and illinois, would have to much influence of a think there is a balance. others think that sent the candidates primarily go to these battleground states where it is too close to call to make up the 270 electoral college votes, that the other states get ignored and it suppresses turnout of therefore it is not good for democracy. so, there have been many amendments over the years. not many recently. they stopped in 1979. there was only one attempted to build this last session, 113th congress, did not go anywhere. many amendments attempted -- many states have innovations which we can talk about later if you like. to change the way they count the votes. host: let's go to the phones and go to casey from atlanta, georgia. caller: good morning. and good morning to your guest. guest: good morning. caller: i believe that this conversation is so enlightening and informative. professor thurber can certainly -- i believe 1988, in the state of west virginia, there was a democratic elector that was pledged for the democratic nominee, governor dukakis
come from a state that recognizes same-sex marriage, like massachusetts, like new york, know what the state has to recognize that marriage. and it won't be recognized by any federal purposes, for example, social security. there has been a challenge to the constitutionality of that at -- that act. the court of appeals upheld it unconstitutional. the review has been filed in the supreme court. we haven't acted on it yet but it would be extraordinary for the court to act, to consider the constitutionality of a law passed by congress that a lower court had held unconstitutional. so i think it's most likely that we will have that issue before the court, toward the end of the current term. and then the person who asked the question will -- [inaudible] have the answer. >> another question comes from the auditorium. the lilly ledbetter case, one where you wrote a very emotionally charged dissent, that you, as i recall, read from the branch a game binge -- read from the bench, which is a rare act. and you reflect on that and also how it felt to have literally your request in the dissent, t
vice chairman of the democratic caucus, mr. crowley from new york. >> first -- thank you. i appreciate that round of applause. let me thank both john and javier for including me in this press conference and for welcoming me to the leadership of the house of the democratic caucus. i'm very pleased to be here at this very important moment in time in our nation's history as well. i agree with both john, javier, and i should say as well with tim walz and i won't steal your thunder, tim, what you do today is important not only i think for we as a caucus in terms of setting where we are at but i think also a strong message that the american people sent almost a month ago had a they want to see this congress working to get things done. they re-elected the president. the president ran on an agenda of giving a tax break to 98% of the american people, and that opportunity is before us. the senate has worked their will. it's now our opportunity to do that before the holiday season is over. the expression time is fleeting has never been more apropos than it is today. we have very few working days
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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